People: Gerald D. Skoning, Attorney

Photo of Gerald D. Skoning, Attorney

Gerald D. Skoning

Attorney

Retired Partner

Chicago
Direct: (312) 460-5844
Fax: (312) 460-7844
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Mr. Skoning is a retired partner and a trial lawyer who has practiced for over 35 years in the area of labor and employment law. He has practiced in 25 different federal district courts, eight federal courts of appeal, and has had numerous cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, including Lorance v. AT&T Technologies, Inc. (1989); Caterpillar Inc. v. Williams (1987); AT&T Technologies v. Communication Workers of America (1986); Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company v. EEOC (1983); and University of Chicago v. McDaniel (1975).

Mr. Skoning is a member of faculties of the National Employment Law Institute and the Center for American and International Law (formerly known as The Southwest Legal Foundation) in Dallas, Texas where he teaches courses on labor and employment law and how to defend employment discrimination lawsuits. Mr. Skoning also has written extensively on labor and equal employment opportunity issues. His published articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Personnel Journal, National Law Journal, Legal Times, and others. He is co-author of the book, “Complying with Handicap Discrimination Laws,” and author of the popular book, “The Wackiest Employment Law Cases, 1993-2003,” which takes a look at the lighter side of labor and employment law.

Mr. Skoning has also made guest expert appearances on NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw, the Phil Donahue Show, National Public Radio and Chicago TV news programs, and radio talk shows. He is a nationally recognized lecturer on EEO laws, labor law, and employment litigation.

Mr. Skoning serves on a variety of boards of directors and is a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman of the Labor Management Relations Committee of the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce. He is also Director and immediate past-Chairman of the Chicagoland Project with Industry and is the past-Chairman of the Business Volunteers for the Arts Chicago. He has written extensively on labor and EEO issues and is a nationally recognized lecturer on EEO laws, labor law, affirmative action, and employment litigation.

Mr. Skoning is a retired partner and a trial lawyer who has practiced for over 35 years in the area of labor and employment law. He has practiced in 25 different federal district courts, eight federal courts of appeal, and has had numerous cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, including Lorance v. AT&T Technologies, Inc. (1989); Caterpillar Inc. v. Williams (1987); AT&T Technologies v. Communication Workers of America (1986); Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company v. EEOC (1983); and University of Chicago v. McDaniel (1975).

Mr. Skoning is a member of faculties of the National Employment Law Institute and the Center for American and International Law (formerly known as The Southwest Legal Foundation) in Dallas, Texas where he teaches courses on labor and employment law and how to defend employment discrimination lawsuits. Mr. Skoning also has written extensively on labor and equal employment opportunity issues. His published articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Personnel Journal, National Law Journal, Legal Times, and others. He is co-author of the book, “Complying with Handicap Discrimination Laws,” and author of the popular book, “The Wackiest Employment Law Cases, 1993-2003,” which takes a look at the lighter side of labor and employment law.

Mr. Skoning has also made guest expert appearances on NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw, the Phil Donahue Show, National Public Radio and Chicago TV news programs, and radio talk shows. He is a nationally recognized lecturer on EEO laws, labor law, and employment litigation.

Mr. Skoning serves on a variety of boards of directors and is a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman of the Labor Management Relations Committee of the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce. He is also Director and immediate past-Chairman of the Chicagoland Project with Industry and is the past-Chairman of the Business Volunteers for the Arts Chicago. He has written extensively on labor and EEO issues and is a nationally recognized lecturer on EEO laws, labor law, affirmative action, and employment litigation.

Education

  • J.D., University of Michigan Law School (1967)
  • A.B., Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (1964)
  • Article 32 Certification, U.S. Naval Justice School (1968)
     

Admissions

  • Illinois

Courts

  • United States Supreme Court
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third, Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Tenth, and Eleventh Circuits
  • U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
  • U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana

Affiliations

  • Seventh Circuit Bar Association
  • Chicago Association of Commission and Industry
  • Chicagoland Project with Industry, Director and Immediate Past-Chairman
  • Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce, Member, Executive Committee and Chairman, Labor Management Relations Committee
  • Princeton Club of Chicago, Director
  • Business Volunteers for the Arts-Chicago, Past-Chairman
  • Center for American and International Law (formerly The Southwestern Legal Foundation), Faculty Member
  • National Employment Law Institute, Advisory Board and Faculty Member
  • Illinois FEPC Task Force on Handicapped Employees, Member
  • Illinois Public/Private Child Care Council, Member

Publications

  • Adopt Uniform Standards (National Law Journal, April 24, 2006)
  • The Wackiest Employment Cases of the Year (National Law Journal, 1993-2003)
  • When the Feds Know All About You (Chicago Tribune, 2003)
  • Guantanomo:  Our “Disappeared” (National Law Journal, 2003)
  • Military Will Bring Justice to Accused Terrorists (Chicago Tribune, 2002)
  • The Privacy Pledge (Chicago Tribune, 2001)
  • Labor & Employment Law Report (Seyfarth Shaw, 2000)
  • Explanation of Sexual Harassment: Are They Viable Defenses? (HR Magazine, 1998)
  • Be Careful Not To “Tripp”: Legal Issues in Workplace Tape Recording (HR Magazine, 1998)
  • Sued if You Do, Sued if You Don’t: Coming to Terms With American’s Schizophrenic Sexual Harassment Laws (Chicago Tribune, 1998)
  • Federal Judiciary: Reluctant Personnel Czar (Chicago Tribune, 1997)
  • Litigious Society Tests Disability Law (Chicago Tribune, 1994)
  • The Wackiest Employment Law Cases of the Year (The National Law Journal 1993 - 1997)
  • Business Drowns in Rules (The National Law Journal, 1992)
  • Women Already Have the Tools to Break Glass Ceiling (Chicago Tribune, 1991)
  • Reagan Judges:  Bad News for Business? (Wall Street Journal, 1989)
  • Must Industry Shoulder Uncle Sam’s Failures (Personnel Journal, 1987)
  • Complying with Equal Employment Regulations for Handicapped Persons (1979)
  • Airline Safety and Labor Relations Law:  Balancing Rights and Responsibilities (1982)
  • Comparable Worth:  Uncharted and Treacherous Waters (1984)
  • Apples, Oranges and Comparable Worth (1984)